“How Does $650 Worth in School Donations go Officially Unaccounted for and Unrecognized?” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

$650 Worth in Educational Item Donations Doesn't Just Appear out of Nowhere to then Become Officially Unaccounted for

$650 Worth in Educational Item Donations Doesn’t Just Appear out of Nowhere to then Become Officially Unaccounted for

Each year, representatives of schools within the United States and throughout the world openly and gratefully receive monetary and material donations and gifts for the benefit of their students and the students’ education.  With economic times being tougher, many schools have an increasing need and appreciation for any and all types of appropriate donations, grants, scholarships, and other support.  One would think that whatever donations are made by people to schools would be accounted for and recognized, however this is not always the case.

In the last year, 2011, I made a large donation of material gifts-in-kind to a local school in the Greater Atlanta Area.  My donation included many items that went directly to five teachers.  Educational materials and items that I donated included a heavy-duty dry erase/chalk easal board, chalk, dry erase board cleaning solution, children’s books, many workbooks in various subjects for primary and middle school-aged students, many laminated educational posters, a globe, educationally-related hard cover books in history and literature, a model of a human heart, a plant cell model, a musical item, teacher grade books, and an audio tape series with an accompanying book. 

Nearly all of the items were in perfect or excellent condition, and are estimated in value to be at least $650 or more.  All of the items were those that I used in my own teaching – in educating my own son or instructing middle school students.  Having not taught for several years and feeling that the school to which I donated them would find the materials useful, I was happy to generously-donate the items for the benefit of the students and teachers there.  I also informed two clergy members, a school principal, and an upper administrator of the school system of my donation.  Two of the four of them, at least, acknowledged my contributions.  However, my donation was officially unaccounted for and unrecognized in the school’s Annual Report.

One must imagine my great disappointment and loss of faith in others in realizing that my donation was unaccounted for and unrecognized in the official yearly report of the school for 2012.  While each teacher to whom I donated the items verbally expressesd their thankfulness, and while I informed several other spiritual and/or school leaders about my donation, one must wonder how such a large donation is unaccounted for and unrecognized. 

Are such donations unvalued?  Are they unimportant?  How often does this occur?  How could nine people know of the donations, yet no one account for them until I informed about the oversight?  (As of December 24, 2012, I received an official letter accounting for my donations, however the letter is incorrect, identifying that the materials were received by the school in 2012, when I actually donated them to the school in 2011.  I have since informed the appropriate people of the error.)

Admittedly, I had considered donating the items to other organizations and causes – or even trying to sell them, but I did not do that.  The particular school to which I donated the items was my first choice, and I believed, my best choice.  But, alas, as has also happened in the past when I made a donation to the school, it went officially unrecognized and unaccounted for.  At least I was recognized during one particular year when I stated that I desired to be recognized anonymously, though this is, in fact, the second time that my donations have gone unrecognized and unaccounted for at the school.  One would think that such a large donation of at least $650 worth of items from a struggling family that is not well off would be officially recognized and accounted for in the Annual Report.

I made a very special effort to donate all of the materials that I did to the particular school that received them.  Items valued at $650 or more do not just appear out of nowhere and then become unaccounted for.  There are many people out there, such as myself, for whom it is a hardship to purchase such items and/or make such a large donation.  Take a moment and imagine if you made such a donation, and how you would feel if it was unaccounted for and unrecognized.  Think of informing many people in leadership positions about the donation, but yet, it not even being identified within the school’s official annual fiscal report. 

It is truly a great disappointment, and places a damper on any desire to make future donations.  Particularly when such donations are officially unrecognized, overlooked, and unaccounted for by the very school leaders who seek them, one loses alot of hope in people that one’s donation was ever meaningful or valued.  One questions the record-keeping and oversight of such donations to schools when situations such as this arise. 

I initially felt wonderful about my generosity in donating so many educational items to teachers at the particular school.  While I believe my donation was appreciated by them, it is very discouraging and disappointing that such a large donation of material gifts-in-kind was not officially recognized and accounted for.  It is particularly discouraging as an individual who is not well off, and for whom it was a hardship to purchase the items, as well as to donate them, not to have been officially recognized – twice.  While I support the school and the education that it provides students, such experiences make me reconsider making future donations of great substance or monetary amount.

“How do you Treat Others?” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

If you are uncomfortable with people or issues, do you just stick your head in the ground?

I love this picture.  I just think it’s so funny, but also sad.  Locating it today while reading a fellow blogger’s post, I thought it appropriate to borrow for my own post on how people treat each other.  Too often, people think ill of, mistreat, and/or misjudge each other.  Like this ostrich, for many people, it’s just easier to stick one’s head in the ground, so to speak.  Then, people are free to misjudge and mistreat each other because they refuse to see, understand, deal with, or cope with others and issues. 

In the past year, I have worked hard at and have achieved a presence on LinkedIn.  My connections span more than 800 people around the world, representing people of all backgrounds and professions, with all types of interests and beliefs.  LinkedIn provides me with a vehicle to connect with others – of similar and different interests and backgrounds – throughout the world.  It also provides me with a professional support system for those who are like-minded, and who stand up for causes for which I also support and in which I am active. 

On a smaller scale, I have also worked to achieve a much smaller presence on WordPress with this blog.  Admittedly, I have not worked hard at it, and that was not my intention.  However, it has been my intention to share, educate, and inform about causes in which I believe, views that I hold, and certain life experiences.  It has been refreshing, energizing, and inspiring to connect with and be supported by others who share similar beliefs, by others who work to further certain causes, by those who stand up for and take action for the good of others.

What is particularly interesting, and perhaps somewhat saddening and discouraging, are those folks who place roadblocks in the way of understanding, relating, empathizing, and/or simply communicating a good and/or supportive word.  What I have noticed is that many people who are aware of the causes that I support, as well as what I say or communicate which may not be what they want to hear, stick their heads in the ground, similarly to the ostrich in the photo. 

Because these folks feel uncomfortable with hearing about, knowing about, and/or even communicating about issues related to bullying, retaliation, child physical and sexual abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, sexism, sexual harassment, women’s and children’s rights and welfare, and women’s equality, they misjudge, mistreat, turn away, and put up roadblocks to a greater understanding and awareness surrounding these issues. 

These folks have already made their judgements and/or misjudgements about me as the messenger, advocate, and activist, as well as about the issues.  Once they have turned themselves off, it is typically like talking to a wall to encourage and promote interaction due to their discomforts and unnecessary judgements.  It causes me to wonder how discouraged and disappointed Jesus – a wonderful, compassionate, innocent, and loving man – must have felt when so many people turned against him and condemned him.

Sadly, I have experienced certain people whom I had considered friendly and/or friends to be avoidant or mute, lacking in interaction and communication, even turning away and shutting me out – simply because they are uncomfortable with those issues, what I communicate about those issues, and/or that I am at all associated with those issues.   Is it so uncomfortable to them to communicate with and/or interact with another individual who supports improvement in each of those areas?  For many, I see that the answer is, “Yes.” 

Perhaps, too often, people have their own issues and problems with which they are dealing, and they are unable to deal with or cope with hearing about, supporting, and/or advocating for positive change in those areas.  They, therefore, may misjudge, mistreat, and/or blame the messenger.  To me, such actions reflect that people, too often, may react toward certain people or issues without fully listening to, understanding, and/or delving more deeply through the superficial layers that they solely wish to perceive.  And, as a result, such reactions are disappointing and discouraging. 

I feel sympathy for those who do not understand, for those who blame the messenger, for those who – by their own inability to cope – are unable to stand with and support others who are working toward positive change for everyone.  It always saddens me to “lose” a friend simply because I have exercised my right to free speech and have shared particular hard truths with them about certain issues.  When people are unsupportive of others who promote activism and positive change for important issues, respect for and confidence in them by the activists is also lost.  That stated, I am not one who is afraid to tackle the tough, challenging issues.  And, I have a profound appreciation and respect for comrades who stand up for others in order to achieve improvement and positive change. 

Throughout my life, there have seemed to be few who are willing to take risks and go out on a limb to promote important causes, and be activists and advocates for improving various areas of human life.  Therefore, it is, indeed, disappointing to witness so many who are content and satisfied with simply walking away from such issues, refusing to become more educated about them, thinking such things won’t happen to them, turning their backs on others because someone says what they don’t want to hear, thinking they can avoid the people and the issues – until they have personal experience with them.

I find that most people are conformists, going with the flow, not wanting to make waves, not rocking the boat.  In order to make our world better for ourselves and our children, we must be willing to take those risks in standing up for and supporting what is good and right.  We must denounce those who harm others in any way.  We must be role models for them and provide education in better, more successful ways to respond and react toward injustices, crimes, and/or mistreatment – ranging anywhere from poverty to bullying to rape and murder.  We must remain compassionate, kind, and nurturing, but also honest, direct, assertive, and active. 

All of the issues that I have identified in this post are likely those that many people do not wish to hear, however such issues must be addressed in such a way that will make the future better – not worse – for those who come after us.  The issues are reflective of those relating to human rights, feminism, and social justice.  They are good and important issues, as are the messengers who advocate for and support positive change regarding them.  Therefore, let people not blame the messengers of the news that they don’t want to hear, but let them get involved, become more educated, achieve greater understanding, and work to create improvement and positive change so that the world is a better place for everyone!

References:

 Ostrich photograph.  From “All Tied up and Nowhere to go: Ostriches lead us to our doom.”  September 26, 2012.  http://atung.net/2012/09/03/ostriches-lead-us-to-our-doom/.