Multiculturalism and Social Justice in Counseling (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Multiculturalism and social justice in counseling are areas necessitating increased understanding and competence. This essay addresses the revised American Counseling Association (ACA) multicultural and social justice counseling (MSJC) competencies (Ratts, Singh, Nassar-McMillan, et al., 2015). Identified will be committee composition and controversial text. Addressed will be competency-meaning to this author, and ways of competency-inclusion in education and practice. Finally discussed will be difficulties regarding competency-integration into education and practice, and ways to lessen challenges.

Multicultural competence is “having…the ability to work effectively across diverse cultural groups and…expertise to treat clients from certain culturally diverse groups…[and]…minority and underrepresented groups” (Tao, Owen, Pace, & Imel, 2015). Social justice in counseling means understanding “societal structures…that marginalize and oppress individuals,” while broadly-addressing inequalities (Roysircar, 2008). The competencies have expansive personal meaning, though are not all-inclusive. An example is that the committee was diverse, though mostly included men and minorities. Most counselors are Caucasian (Hays, Chang, & Havice, 2008), with White women warranting inclusion. Further, divisive wording throughout the competencies, identifying counselors as “privileged and marginalized,” should be revised (Ratts, Singh, Nassar-McMillan, et al., 2015).

There are several ways to include the competencies in education programs. Students can be required to complete relevant courses and intern at diverse facilities. Another way is to require achievement of specific continuing education credits. Potential barriers to achieving this include finances and time needed for program completion. Ways to overcome these barriers are obtaining student loans and adding educational requirements.

Counselors must take opportunities to experience diverse cultures and social justice issues, aimed at practice-application. Therapists must periodically check-in with clients during sessions to ascertain understanding. Challenges to applications in practice may relate to personal background and beliefs. Another challenge may relate to low degrees of diversity in some areas. Counselors must motivate themselves to expand experiences and apply competencies with broader populations to overcome challenges.

Over two decades ago, Sue, Arredondo, and McDavis (1992) encouraged multicultural competency implementation. Those standards were recently-revised, adding social justice competencies. Concerns remain, however, with this overdue revision. Challenges exist regarding competency integration into education and practice, though difficulties can be overcome. The MSJC competencies provide a framework for counselors regarding associated knowledge and skills.

References

Hays, D.G., Chang, C.Y., & Havice, P. (2008). White racial identity statuses as predictors of White privilege awareness. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education and Development 47 (2), 234-246.

Ratts, M.J., Singh, A.A., Nassar-McMillan, S., Butler, S.K., & McCullough, J.R. (2015). Multicultural and Social Justice Competences in Counseling. American Counseling Association.

Roysircar, G. (2008). A response to “Social privilege, social justice, and group counseling: An inquiry”: Social privilege: Counselors’ competence with systematically determined inequalities. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work 33 (4), 377-384.

Sue, D.W., Arredondo, P., & McDavis, R.J. (1992). Multicultural counseling competencies and standards: A call to the profession. Journal of Counseling and Development 70 (4), 477-486.

Tao, K.W., Owen, J., Pace, B.T., & Imel, Z.E. (2015). A meta-analysis of multicultural competencies and psychotherapy process and outcome. Journal of Counseling Psychology 62 (3), 337-350.

Author’s Note: This is an essay that I recently submitted for the American Counseling Association’s Doctoral/Graduate Essay Contest.  Fifteen awards were issued, nationwide. Although I was not fortunate to be selected as a winner, I have the satisfaction of having participated in the competition.  It is certainly difficult to create an essay of 500 words or less and include thorough references, as ethically should be done.  I could have included approximately 120 additional words in my essay without the references.  The sponsors of the competition might consider expanding the word length of the essays to 1,000.  I originally wrote an essay of that length, and edited out half of it!

 

This Valentine’s Day, Practice Love and Understanding (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Water Heart Design (from www.newevolutiondesigns.com, February 14, 2015)

Water Heart Design (from http://www.newevolutiondesigns.com, February 14, 2015)

It is St. Valentine’s Day, a day for love and romance, especially as reflected in our culture and history. Valentine’s Day is a day that is important for couples, though it is also important for everyone. On Valentine’s Day, everyone can show a little more love, respect, appreciation, and understanding toward each other.

I’ve already heard the national news today of a plot to kill people in a mall in Canada that was thwarted. Later today, I heard about a cartoonist in Denmark who was killed – an artist who apparently depicted Mohammed in a negative manner. There are also likely so many more countless tragedies, hate crimes, and killings that have occurred around the world.

Today – as every day – however, should be a day for spreading love, kindness, compassion, and understanding. Do not be the person who is ugly toward or who hurts others. Take the opportunity to do an act of kindness for another.

For those who are unable or unwilling to practice loving kindness and understanding, my heart and prayers go out to you. I understand that, sometimes, life experiences may make it more difficult to love, but it should not be an excuse to avoid doing so.

On this day of all days, we must open our hearts and practice loving kindness and forgiveness. Of course, that does not mean that we should fall victim to being hurt for doing so, however setting a good, positive example may be all a person needs for his or her spirit to be uplifted, even for one day.

How will you practice love, kindness, and understanding toward others today?

“Women need more Appreciation and Respect” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Is it just me, or does this happen to women alot?  Women who are assertive, confident, direct, honest, independent, educated, and who may be single, divorced, and/or widowed are unappreciated and not respected by many men.  Not only are such women unappreciated and not respected by men, but also by other women and the greater society, and others may feel very threatened by their confidence and assertiveness – and blame the women for it due to their own discomfort!  What is it about us?  What is it that people dislike?

I’m not a person who asks for or tends to “need” alot from others.  I try to “handle” and cope with the majority of situations and experiences that I have independently.  I’m not a gossip, though when something is going wrong and could be improved or enhanced, I speak up, making myself and my views known.  What I find is that, for the most part, most people just don’t care.  In fact, I often find that the more I speak up, the worse the situation gets.

Why is that?  Do most people believe that they have enough of their own life situations to deal with?  Do they feel that there is no need to invest anything, emotionally, into someone else’s difficulties, challenges, struggles, or troubles?  Are people afraid to get involved?  Or, is it that they really, simply just don’t care?

It would be interesting to me if a study was performed to research all of these attributes and characteristics of women, and the manner in which men, other women, and even the greater society views and/or treats us.  It would also be interesting to me to ascertain whether or not there are differences in such perspectives and treatment of women across different regions of the country – such as in the north, south, east, and west – in the United States. 

The South is known as the Stroke Belt.  Of course, there are studies that have been completed about why this is so.  I would like to offer my own simple analysis, not based on any research, but based on my own observations and experiences. 

It seems to me that women in the South are often not allowed to be themselves.  In order to be fully accepted into Southern society, women are subtly and silently “required” to speak and behave more like men, be supportive cheerleaders of men, be agreeable and not ask any questions of men, and be submissive to and/or dependent on men.  Additionally, women in the South are required to do all of these things while also remaining “beautiful,” appearing young, and being a great physical, mental, and emotional condition.  Any women who does not seem to “meet” those requirements is not part of the “in” and/or “accepted” crowd.

Perhaps unknowingly, women in other parts of the country do the same, to a certain extent.  Women unconsciously “conform” ourselves to fit in and be more socially acceptable.  How many women do you know believe they have to drink with their boyfriend and/or his buddies at sports games in order to fit in and be acceptable?  How many women do you know pile on the make-up, and spend loads of money for hair and nail treatments, thinking that this makes them more attractive?  How many women do you see at your workplace who are especially kind and friendly to the boss, seeking more favor?

It is not easy to be a woman in today’s society.  Women are “required” to do, say, and “be” so many things, to serve in so many roles.  And, in all this, women are also expected not to become upset, not to complain, not to vent, not to become emotional.  We are expected to be able to handle it all!  Certainly, some of us can be considered superwomen, but after awhile, the stresses, pressures, expectations, and requirements take their toll.  Stroke, cancer, heart disease, and other conditions and/or ailments are a result of the constant, unceasing expectations and requirements that society places upon us. 

Therefore, women need more appreciation and respect in our society – in our families, our homes, our churches, our communities, our nation, our world.  People ought to try to place themselves in another’s shoes and walk in those shoes for awhile.  Rather than overlooking, not appreciating, and not respecting each other’s experiences and who we are as individuals, people must realize that life isn’t always easy for everyone.  Their lack of appreciation, and absence of understanding and respect just makes it that much more difficult for us.  But again, do they really care? 

As a member of a particular group at my church, I was recently overlooked by the male leader of the group.  The leader is about my age, married, and has a family, though he always appeared to take a sort of “flippant” and uncaring attitude toward me.  Today, he realized that he had not included me on any of the group’s e-mails and communications for several months, and that by doing so, I was not informed of a group meeting and photo.  He apologized to me about the situation – by e-mail – though it all just brought tears to my eyes. 

Why am I the person who is regularly overlooked, unappreciated, uncared for, not respected?  Are all of my positive qualities that much of a threat to others that they consciously or unconsciously exclude me from their own thinking?  It is so disppointing and tragic to keep experiencing these types of situations over and over again.  I could change who I am, but then I wouldn’t be “me.”  Maybe most people would like me better if I was more gossipy, untruthful, and fake.  I wouldn’t be true to myself if I behaved like that.  I wonder how many people would truly be able to walk in my shoes?

“Good Shepherd Sunday: Be A Good Shepherd Today and Everyday” By Michele Babcock-Nice

“Good Shepherd Sunday:

Be A Good Shepherd Today and Everyday”

By Michele Babcock-Nice

April 29, 2012

Today is “Good Shepherd Sunday,” a day for reflecting upon and remembering all the goodness that Jesus has done for us, particularly in his suffering and dying to save us from sin and damnation. Good Shepherd Sunday focuses on John 10 in which Jesus basically tells His followers that He is the Good Shepherd, that in John 10:7, He is “the door of the sheep.” In John 10: 11-15, Jesus states, “I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep…and I lay down my life for the sheep.” Jesus goes on to say, “I give unto them eternal life…” (John 10: 28).

God calls all of us to be good shepherds. The homily that the priest at my church shared today was related to that theme, again calling all of us to be each other’s caretakers, not just being shepherds, but being good shepherds. He also stated the being a good shepherd is not an easy task. In his homily, my pastor also stated that there are those who are wolves, who turn on the shepherd and the sheep.

Importantly and agreeably, we must all be shepherds – and good ones at that. In being good shepherds, God calls us to care for others as well as ourselves, and also to recognize the ways in which we have been sinful, as well as to repent and improve our behavior and our lives. And, sometimes, it is not easy to perceive those who are wolves. At times, wolves masquerade among us as those wearing sheep’s clothing.

It is, therefore, extremely important that we are all good shepherds, being good caretakers of each other, particularly those who are most vulnerable, most in need, and most innocent. Prayer, self-reflection, and requests to God from us to do His will are important in helping us to be better caretakers of others and ourselves, as well as to be good shepherds. Also, if good works are unseen and unrecognized – or worse, viewed as injurious – we must seek shelter, protection, guidance, and comfort from the one and only Good Shepherd, for He sees, knows, and understands everything, even if the world around us does not.

On this Good Shepherd Sunday, seek and strive to be a good shepherd, to your church, to your family, to your neighbors, to your colleagues, to your community, to yourself. Seek to do the greater good. Do not strive to be self-seeking. Place yourself and your works in God’s hands, and He will guide you in being that good shepherd whom He wants you to be.

References

The Holy Bible (1979).  Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.

“Understanding Today’s Children and Youth: Are you Really in Tune with Today’s Kids?” By: Michele Babcock-Nice

Understanding Today’s Children and Youth:

Are you Really in Tune with Today’s Kids?

By: Michele Babcock-Nice

Our children and students experience so many issues, worries, stresses, expectations, peer pressures, and unfairness in our schools when adults who are entrusted with teaching, supervising, and/or parenting them are not “in touch” or “in tune” with them.  As adults, we must have the proper insights into situations and practice the appropriate actions related to children and students. This means that we must listen to them, be there for them, and be respectful of them and their feelings.

When adults do not listen to children or students, and when they are not properly “in-tune” with them, not viewing all sides of a story or situation, not thoroughly investigating a situation and the reasons for it’s occurrence, not believing children – unless there is good reason not to – that they lose respect for adults, including teachers, administrators, parents, and others in the community.

When this occurs, children and students may believe that they are “on their own” when it comes to having to deal with certain issues, such as bullying and retaliation, including that done toward the child or student by other students, teachers, administrators, parents, and/or others in the community. The child or student may wonder who is there to support him or her. He or she may think it is not worth sharing their issue or concern with adults if the adults don’t believe them, don’t support them, blame them, don’t listen to them, and instead, punish them.

These are the issues that children and students deal with everyday, at home, in school, and elsewhere. When the damage is done to a child by an adult lying against a child just to save his or her own reputation, it incorrectly and unjustly brands the child as dishonest, disrespectful, or a troublemaker. I don’t think that most children seek to cause trouble or be troublemakers. In my perspective, most children want to do whatever they can to please others. If they don’t, they may be grappling with some personal issues.

Therefore, adults don’t need to do more damage to a child by disbelieving the truth, then reprimanding, ignoring, bullying, or otherwise punishing them. Adults must seek to investigate and uncover the whole story – the entire situation, and to understand the reasons for it’s occurrence. Then, it is up to the adults to see that those situations don’t happen again, and that positive steps are taken to assist the child or student in knowing they can be trusting enough of an adult to share the situation with him or her.

There are so many who do damage to children and students, and don’t even realize it. The slightest insult, reprimand, punishment, lack of fairness, and disbelief by a teacher, administrator, parent, or other person can do so much to harm children and students – I have seen it and experienced it, myself, and with my own child. It is those who have the insights into these matters who are then left to try our best to “undo” the damage done by others to children and students.

Sometimes, trying to undo the damage comes in the form of providing incentives and rewards for children and students, in an attempt to repair the unfair punishment(s) the child or student experienced at the hands of others. Other times, undoing the damage may involve therapy or professional support. It is sad when adults don’t realize or care about the damage they’ve done, are dishonest about it, and continue their same behaviors because they have been believed rather than the child or student.

There are those children or students who may actually seek to damage the reputation of another, however, with the insightful adult discovering and investigating the whole story, such damage can be avoided and eliminated.

As adults, we must do our best to be mentally and emotionally “in touch” and “in tune” with our children and students as much as possible in positive ways. When was the last time you really listened to and/or believed your child or student lately?

Book Review of “Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus” (Dr. Mic Hunter); Book Review by Michele Babcock-Nice

Jesus Died so we May Live

Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus, by Dr. Mic Hunter, is a provocative, open-minded, “think outside-of-the-box”-type of work that appeals to the individual of any faith and who desires questions, answers, and principles about God, Jesus, and Jesus’ teachings to be explained and supported in an extremely “real-life,” highly-rational, thoroughly-contemplative, and wonderfully-inspirational manner.  

Dr. Hunter’s book is one that readers will find difficulty putting down once they have begun reading it.  When one starts to read it, he or she develops a hunger to read and learn more about what Dr. Hunter has to say.  The reader may even re-read and re-examine part or all of the book several times because it is so well-thought, provocative, and insightful. 

Especially for those who are interested in religion, Jesus’ teachings, Christianity, self-education, and lifelong spiritual growth and development, Dr. Hunter’s book is the epitome of works that reach the very depths of the human soul, and honestly and realistically examine the meanings behind the manner by which Jesus desires people to live.

A very modern, up-to-date, and quite all-encompassing work, Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus examines many present-day issues within society, including war, homosexuality, wealth, poverty, child abuse, universal health care, sexuality, divorce, capital punishment, and the manner by which women, children, and homosexuals are viewed and treated. 

Jesus Finding the Lost Lamb

Highly-supported are the themes that Dr. Hunter presents, with quotes and references to the Bible, as well as his utilization of additional published resources.  Dr. Hunter’s writing is based in the principles and teachings of Jesus – in the manner by which they were originally written, understood, and translated – rather than the “watered-down” versions of today that may exclude or conceal true meanings and understanding.

Dr. Hunter, in his sharing and support of his information in Back to the Source, successfully tells many sides of a story or theme.  In other words, he gets down to the “nitty-gritty” of current, real-life events, as well as particular events and issues in the Bible and in Jesus’ time.  Dr. Hunter tells it like it is, basing his writing in the love that Jesus has for each person, no matter what background, faith, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, gender, or social status.  In fact, Dr. Hunter is so honest, sincere, and genuine in his writing in that it is so “real” that some readers may get a true education regarding Jesus’ teachings in comparison to certain “popular” societal views and practices. 

In Dr. Hunter’s book, we are consistently reminded that we should seek to orient ourselves and our thoughts and actions in the manner of Jesus.  We are informed to recall that we should and must behave with genuine love and compassion toward everyone, including our enemies.  We are called to remember that we must employ peacefulness and nonviolence in our lifestyles. 

In the manner of an enlightened individual who has had life experience and who is a man of deep faith, Dr. Hunter states that behaving in a loving, compassionate, and peaceful manner is a sign of strength rather than of weakness – as so many in our world seem to believe.  We are reminded that we must be open-minded, tolerant, forgiving, and supportive of others, especially those who are most in need, including the poor, children who are abused and neglected, and those who experience violence and discrimination, such as homosexuals.  We are reminded that people in need and in crisis are worthy of our aid and support.

Jesus Being Crucified

Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus is a work that has taught me more in my faith than I have learned as a lifelong Roman Catholic.  So often, we are “preached at” by our religious institutions without being provided with a greater understanding of Jesus’ teachings and principles.  Dr. Hunter’s book provides the instruction and education that is necessary and that is presently lacking in people’s everyday “going-through-the-motions” type of faith. 

This work further shares and describes genuine observations on how Christians and others of faith in God are not living as we should.  Dr. Hunter calls us to recognize that we should not point fingers at others without first reflecting upon ourselves, on whether or not we hold true the Ten Commandments, and on whether or not we are truly living in the manner that Jesus taught.  To support his observations, Dr. Hunter shares research and statistics of countries throughout the world that are comparable with each other, most particularly the United States of America. 

Therefore, by no means is Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus your common, everyday book about religion, religious faith, and spiritual principles.  It is a book that should be considered a thorough and educational research and reference guide to many Biblical passages and interpretations, the spiritual principles and teachings of Jesus, and a text that tackles current, important issues within our society and how they are – and could be – resolved and improved. 

Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus is a spiritually-enlightened work, written by an open-minded, educated, experienced, wise, and professional individual, who is courageous and unafraid of addressing what occurs, what is good and beneficial, what is lacking, and what is still needed in our society – in order that people may truly practice, understand, and “live” their faith.   Dr. Hunter’s many years of experience as a psychotherapist also give him the knowledge that certain programs for people who are struggling with addictions are based in Jesus’ teachings, and are beneficial, in practice and commitment, to those whom they serve.

Dr. Hunter provides for the reader an opportunity to increase his or her faith, to improve his or her life through a greater understanding and practice of Jesus’ teachings, and to truly, genuinely, and sincerely “live” as Jesus wants us to live.  We are challenged to examine our patterns of thought and action, as well as our lifestyles, so that we may more appropriately follow and understand what Jesus expects of us.  We are reminded to be guided by Jesus’ holy teachings in our lives, to correctly understand the true meaning of his principles, and not to stray from His real expectations. 

I, therefore, am extremely pleased to recommend Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus with the highest of praise and compliments, and without any reservations.

Source

Hunter, M. (2011).  Back to the Source: The Spiritual Principles of Jesus.  Charleston, South Carolina: Mic Hunter.