February Snow in Georgia

20200208_105913

Snow on the cherry tree, Snellville, Georgia, February 8, 2020

We haven’t seen snow here in Georgia for the past few years. For me, as a Yankee, it’s always a treat to get snow in the South! I definitely miss it, especially the skiing. Both the North and South have their advantages and disadvantages, though I don’t miss the brutal cold of those Buffalo winters.

20200208_105946

Snow in Snellville, Georgia, February 8, 2020

Last weekend, though it was 39 degrees Fahrenheit, it was snowing here in Snellville on Saturday morning, February 8, 2020. It snowed for most of the morning – a heavy, wet snow with huge snowflakes. It was so pretty – and was more like what winter should be – rather than the 65 degree Fahrenheit temperatures we have today, less than one week later.

20200208_110008

Let it Snow! Snellville, Georgia, February 8, 2020

On February 8, my son was training fellow Boy Scouts at his troop’s bi-annual leadership training event. They also took some time out from their instruction to step outside and have a friendly snowball fight. That’s another good memory to include in my Eagle Scout son’s wonderful experience in scouting! Oh – and by the way – the daffodils are blooming in full force now and the maples are budding out, too…

Early Daffodils & Azaleas in January

20200114_124334

Daffodils, Snellville, Georgia, January 13, 2020

Last Monday, January 13, 2020, the first daffodils blossomed here in Snellville, Georgia. Their blooming is about three weeks earlier than usual. There was a warm spell here for about five days prior to their blooming. Temperatures got up to around 65 degrees Fahrenheit as a high.

20200114_124459

Small pink azalea bush blooming, Snellville, Georgia, January 13, 2020

Coincidentally, nearly all of the dozens of azaleas on our property were starting to bloom. In the pictures I took of a couple of them, they don’t appear very full of blossoms, but many were just starting to come out.

20200114_124419

Small white azalea bush blooming, Snellville, Georgia, January 13, 2020

By this week, we were back to the cold again. The cold snap that got down to about 25 degrees Fahrenheit two days ago took all of those azalea blossoms away. There are none now. Surprisingly, however, the daffodils are still in bloom. They survived the cold, for now.

Global warming is real. This weather is definitely not normal. There were even two Japanese maples that were trying to bud out last week. Now, they’ve been frozen back into hibernation again. This is definitely not good. Thankfully, Greta can put a voice to the concerns that so many of us have!

Time Goes by so Fast

IMG_3830.JPG

My son, a Life-rank Boy Scout, Snellville, Georgia, June 2018

It has been several months since I last posted here on WordPress. It’s not for a lack of desire to write or post, but because the time goes by so fast and I’m very busy with life. It’s actually a good feeling to be busy because I know I’m using my time wisely and constructively. Being there as a support for my teenage son in all of his activities, and continuing my work as a counselor takes up most of my time. It’s all very rewarding and it’s great to enjoy this time in my life. Because the time goes by so quickly, I know it’s important to enjoy every moment as much as possible.

My son has accomplished some milestones in the past several months since I last posted. When he turned 15, he got his driver’s permit here in Georgia. Right now, he is actually very busy, so he has practiced driving very little. Of course, there is more of that to come. In Boy Scouts, he attended two leadership camps this past summer, including one at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico. It was a great experience for him. He also earned his Hornaday Badge Award and held his Honor Court for that in September. Now, he’s working on his Eagle project, and finishing up his last remaining Eagle-required merit badges. He really loves Boy Scouts and hopes to stick with it. School is also going well for him, and he is already a sophomore. I’m so proud of him! Indeed, the time goes by so fast!

Trees Lost in Snellville due to Tropical Storm Irma

IMG_2487.JPG

A tree in my neighborhood lost to Tropical Storm Irma, Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

After the Carribean, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Florida were hard-hit by Hurricane Irma, its effects were felt here in Snellville, Georgia after it traveled up the west coast of Florida early last week.

We lost power for almost 1.5 days in Tropical Storm Irma that came through this area.  Traditional schools were closed for three days, and online schools closed for one day.  If what we experienced was a tropical storm, I’ve definitely never seen a rain and wind storm whip around the trees as it did.  Its amazing that more trees did not fall than actually did.

IMG_2485.JPG

Another tree down in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

In my neighborhood, alone, I counted six trees that fell after driving through my area, including a huge oak. With the heavy winds and the ground being saturated, trees with surface roots or those that were rotten fell easily.

IMG_2496.JPG

A fallen tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Just yesterday, in a nearby area, I observed power lines that were laying on the ground. Now, six days after the storm passed through, there are still people in my area who do not have electrical power.

IMG_2491.JPG

A couple of limbs that were ripped off of a tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Seeing the news on TV and the Internet of the damage that Irma did, my heart and prayers go out to everyone who weathered it.  May those who lost their lives rest in peace.  May those who are cleaning up and rebuilding get the help and support they need, quickly.

Mother Nature has shown that a category five hurricane is definitely something to take extremely seriously.

Seeing the Total Solar Eclipse at Boy Scout Camp Rainey Mountain in Clayton, Georgia

IMG_2404.JPG

View of total solar eclipse through the rain clouds at Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

On Monday, August 21, 2017, my son and I traveled to Clayton, Georgia to Boy Scout Camp Rainey Mountain to participate in their special event, held to witness the total solar eclipse!  We met up with other boy scouts from my son’s troop, and enjoyed viewing the eclipse with about 1,000 people who were there for the event.

It was an absolutely wonderful and amazing experience to be in a zone of totality to view the eclipse, even if rain clouds came through during the last 20 minutes before totality.

IMG_2368.JPG

My son and other boy scouts looking at the eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

Thankfully, we did get to see totality for a few seconds when there was a part in the rain clouds, during totality.  The halo around the sun appeared to be lavender in color, through the clouds.  It was really neat!

IMG_2379.JPG

My son and I viewing the solar eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

And, when we experienced totality, the sky became really dark, like it was night time.  Of course, the rain clouds had already caused it to become dark, though the total eclipse made it significantly dark.

Though we were on the road, driving, for a total of 8.75 hours, plus stopping to eat dinner for 45 minutes, it was well, well worth it to take the day and see the total solar eclipse!

IMG_2396.JPG

People in the dark during totality of the solar eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

I saw a partial solar eclipse when I was younger, but this was like no eclipse I’ve ever seen before.  Again, it was really amazing to see totality and was well-worth the trip.  I would do it again if I could, and am so happy that we had the opportunity to go and enjoy seeing the solar eclipse in totality!

Shepherd’s Men on Memorial Day

dscn1866-copy.jpg

People entering the welcoming area of the Shepherd Center at the end of the 2017 Shepherd’s Men Run, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29, 2017

On Memorial Day, my son and family, and members of my son’s Boy Scout troop attended and participated in welcoming the Shepherd’s Men to the final destination of their multi-day run at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta.  Members of my son’s Boy Scout Troop and Venturing Crew in Snellville served in the Honor Guard, posting colors (flags) for the event.  The Shepherd’s men are military veterans – both men and women – who raise awareness and funding to support veterans’ concerns, including those such as suicide, traumatic brain injury, and post traumatic stress disorder.

dscn1905.jpg

Members of the Shepherd’s Men at the Shepherd Center following their 2017 Run, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29, 2017

This year, the Shepherd Center in Atlanta was the final destination of the Shepherd’s Men Run that began in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the location where one of the airplanes from 9/11 went down.  Their multi-day run that ended on Memorial Day was also in remembrance of and to honor civilians who lost their lives in that plane crash. The Shepherd’s Men each wore a 22-pound flak pack, symbolizing the 22 American veterans who commit suicide every day.

The welcoming ceremony included speakers who were wives and/or mothers of veterans, including the wife of a veteran who had traumatic brain injury and came to the Shepherd Center for treatment and the mother of one young soldier who tragically committed suicide without showing signs of being depressed or suicidal.

dscn1885.jpg

Members of Boy Scout Troop and Venturing Crew 548 from Snellville, Georgia as Honor/Color Guard for the 2017 Shepherd’s Men Run, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29, 2017

Other speakers at the event included administrators of the Shepherd Center as well as an Atlanta City Council member.  There were also two singers who sang “America the Beautiful” and “The Star-Spangled Banner” to remember those who’ve died in service to our country.  Many members of the Atlanta Police Department, including those mostly riding motorcycles, also provided an escort for the Shepherd’s Men as they arrived at the Shepherd Center.

The event was poignant, memorable, and sensitive to veterans and their families who are experiencing struggle with physical and mental illnesses, and those who have experienced personal loss and grief.  It was nice to be present and be a supporter of this event and cause that is so important for the support of our veterans and their families.

Tubing at Sugar Mountain, North Carolina

dscn1356

Tubing at Sugar Mountain, North Carolina, February 11, 2017

This weekend, my son and I visited Sugar Mountain, North Carolina and had a fun afternoon tubing.  The temperatures were very mild, and there were light sprinkles throughout the afternoon on February 11.  We were overdressed for the weather, and were too warm as we observed the artificially-made snow melt around us.

I’m an expert skier and was eager to hit the slopes, though my son is a beginner, and was not as confident, which is totally fine.  Sugar Mountain has ice skating, tubing, skiing, and snowboarding, so we had many different activities to choose from, and did not have to stick with skiing.  Tubing was really fun, and likely, less potentially hazardous, especially with the large crowd of people who were there this weekend.

dscn1355

Sugar Mountain, North Carolina Tubing, February 11, 2017

Sixteen years have passed since I first visited Sugar Mountain for skiing.  Sugar Mountain is awesome for skiing, but it is a long drive from our home.  With a stop or two, it takes six hours to get there.  Too bad it’s not a bit closer to Atlanta so we could enjoy it more often!