Trees Lost in Snellville due to Tropical Storm Irma

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A tree in my neighborhood lost to Tropical Storm Irma, Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

After the Carribean, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Florida were hard-hit by Hurricane Irma, its effects were felt here in Snellville, Georgia after it traveled up the west coast of Florida early last week.

We lost power for almost 1.5 days in Tropical Storm Irma that came through this area.  Traditional schools were closed for three days, and online schools closed for one day.  If what we experienced was a tropical storm, I’ve definitely never seen a rain and wind storm whip around the trees as it did.  Its amazing that more trees did not fall than actually did.

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Another tree down in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

In my neighborhood, alone, I counted six trees that fell after driving through my area, including a huge oak. With the heavy winds and the ground being saturated, trees with surface roots or those that were rotten fell easily.

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A fallen tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Just yesterday, in a nearby area, I observed power lines that were laying on the ground. Now, six days after the storm passed through, there are still people in my area who do not have electrical power.

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A couple of limbs that were ripped off of a tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Seeing the news on TV and the Internet of the damage that Irma did, my heart and prayers go out to everyone who weathered it.  May those who lost their lives rest in peace.  May those who are cleaning up and rebuilding get the help and support they need, quickly.

Mother Nature has shown that a category five hurricane is definitely something to take extremely seriously.

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Seeing the Total Solar Eclipse at Boy Scout Camp Rainey Mountain in Clayton, Georgia

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View of total solar eclipse through the rain clouds at Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

On Monday, August 21, 2017, my son and I traveled to Clayton, Georgia to Boy Scout Camp Rainey Mountain to participate in their special event, held to witness the total solar eclipse!  We met up with other boy scouts from my son’s troop, and enjoyed viewing the eclipse with about 1,000 people who were there for the event.

It was an absolutely wonderful and amazing experience to be in a zone of totality to view the eclipse, even if rain clouds came through during the last 20 minutes before totality.

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My son and other boy scouts looking at the eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

Thankfully, we did get to see totality for a few seconds when there was a part in the rain clouds, during totality.  The halo around the sun appeared to be lavender in color, through the clouds.  It was really neat!

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My son and I viewing the solar eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

And, when we experienced totality, the sky became really dark, like it was night time.  Of course, the rain clouds had already caused it to become dark, though the total eclipse made it significantly dark.

Though we were on the road, driving, for a total of 8.75 hours, plus stopping to eat dinner for 45 minutes, it was well, well worth it to take the day and see the total solar eclipse!

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People in the dark during totality of the solar eclipse, Camp Rainey Mountain, Clayton, Georgia, August 21, 2017

I saw a partial solar eclipse when I was younger, but this was like no eclipse I’ve ever seen before.  Again, it was really amazing to see totality and was well-worth the trip.  I would do it again if I could, and am so happy that we had the opportunity to go and enjoy seeing the solar eclipse in totality!

Dogwoods and Azaleas in Full Bloom (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

A couple of days ago, following a heavy, soaking rain in central Georgia near Atlanta, many trees and flowers are now in full bloom, particularly dogwood trees and azalea bushes.  They are really beautiful, and I wanted to share some photos of them here.  Happy Spring!

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Purple Flowers, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Purple Flowers, Snellville, Georgia, April 10, 2014

Pink Azaleas, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Azaleas, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

These are some of my photos of a few of the flowering bushes and trees in my area.  I hope you have enjoyed viewing them!

The Beautiful and Educational Atlanta Botanical Gardens (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

My Son at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

My Son at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

Last week, my son and I took an opportunity, through a special event in which we enjoyed a discounted entry, to enjoy the beautiful and educational Atlanta Botanical Gardens.  I had not been there in at least 13-14 years, and had never before taken my son there to visit.  A great opportunity came up, and so, we went!

My Son Near a Cobra Statue at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

My Son Near a Cobra Statue at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

Among the many varieties of flowers in bloom at the Gardens are tulips, daffodils, and pansies.  They were so beautiful, and the fragrance of the miniature daffodils was wonderful!  It was a treat to speak with a number of the volunteers at the Gardens who gave us information about the collections there, as well as about gardening tools and maintenance.

Frogs Housed in the Conservatory at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

Frogs Housed in the Conservatory at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

At the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, we enjoyed presentations about amphibians and deadly plants.  We also walked through the conservatory, and enjoyed viewing and learning about the various species of frogs that are housed there.

The Japanese Garden at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

The Japanese Garden at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

We also enjoyed walking through the Japanese Garden and the Edible Garden, as well as viewing the many picturesque statues and fountains.

My Son Next to a Fountain at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

My Son Next to a Fountain at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, Georgia, March 2014

In all, my son and I were at the Gardens for about two hours.  Even though it was wet and rainy during our visit, we had a great time.  After all, Spring is here, and with it, comes needed rain!  Visiting the Gardens was also a great way to start Spring Break.

“The Beauty of a Spider’s Web” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Dewey Spider Web, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

Dewey Spider Web, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

About one and a half weeks ago, I went outside early in the morning to take the trash to the curb for the week’s trash pick-up.  The first thing I noticed upon going outside was a lovely spider’s web in the grass near the driveway.  I was so moved at seeing this beautiful work of nature that I went back inside to get my camera and snap a few photos.  I am glad that I did. 

Spiders’ webs – especially those that are in great condition and still wonderfully intact – have been something that I have rarely observed this summer.  I believe that all of the wonderful, but heavily wet weather we have had during this unusually rainy summer has potentially decreased the number of spiders’ webs that have remained actually functional. 

Dewey Spider Web Close-up, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

Dewey Spider Web Close-up, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

So, while there may be few people who take notice of the beauty that can be found in a spider’s web, I would like to take this time to take notice of one of nature’s beautiful creations.  Don’t take the little things for granted.  Someday, they might not be there to notice and enjoy.

“A Wet Summer in the Blue Ridge Mountains” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

View of Blue Ridge Mountains near Thunder Struck Ridge, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

View of Blue Ridge Mountains near Thunder Struck Ridge, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

Last week – the first week of July, 2013 – my son and I spent a couple of days in the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Carolina.  The full day that we spent in the mountains was perfect; we hit the weather just right!  Our sunny, dry day of activities was sandwiched between two rainy, wet days – the days that we spent driving. 

Aerial View of Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

Aerial View of Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

We were blessed and lucky to have a nice vacation day that was so beautiful.  There has been so much rain in the South so far this summer that I was worried that our one summer vacation day spent away from home would be a wash, but it wasn’t.  Thank goodness; it was perfect for us!

View of Blue Ridge Mountains after the Rain, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

View of Blue Ridge Mountains after the Rain, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

It is always refreshing to get away to the mountains – they are so beautiful and majestic.  To be back with nature in it’s fully beauty and greenery is food for the soul.  With all of the rain we have had so far this spring and summer, there is an abundance of greenery all throughout the mountains.  Usually, we are concerned about the lack of rain that contributes to drought, but not this year. 

Mosses and Lichens Growing on Trees in the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

Mosses and Lichens Growing on Trees in the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

There has been so much rain that the mosses and lichens growing on the trees tend to look more like Spanish moss.  The moss is growing to longer lengths than usual because of the highly wet conditions.  Also, there are many more mushrooms and toadstools to be found throughout the forest, as well.

Wild Mushrooms in the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

Wild Mushrooms in the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

With all of the rain, the rivers, creeks, and streams have been swelling with water.  The banks of all of the rivers and creeks that we saw were overpassed, and the water was at a much higher level than usual. 

Soco Falls, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

Soco Falls, North Carolina, July 2, 2013

This, however, led to the increased beauty of the falling water at Soco Falls, a beautiful falls near Maggie Valley and Cherokee, North Carolina in the Blue Ridge Mountains.  This summer, there was a greater volume of water spewing over the falls – the most that I have seen in my past many years of visiting this lovely natural wonder.  It is always refreshing to hear the sound of the waterfalls at Soco Falls.

It is always a wonderful treat to visit and stay in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.  Typically, especially for Southerners, going to the mountains in summer is a cool, refreshing retreat from the usual activities of daily life and those hot, humid days.  This year, visitors will be even more refreshed by the beautiful greenery; cooler temperatures; abundant water from all of the rains; great opportunities for hiking, fishing, sight-seeing, swimming, horseback riding, and other activities; as well as simply enjoying the peaceful beauty of nature.

“Daffodils in January” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Daffodils in January, Atlanta, Georgia area, January 28, 2013

Daffodils in January, Atlanta, Georgia Area, January 28, 2013

In the winter that has been filled with gray days and leafless trees, a burst of yellow can be seen in many areas around Atlanta, already!  Last week, the daffodils began blooming in my area.  Alas, the warm weather intermingled with the freezing cold days have provided enough mild temperatures for these Spring flowers to bloom early again this year.  Last year, it was much the same, and I believe that the daffodils bloomed even earlier, perhaps by one or two weeks.

So, while it is refreshing to observe and enjoy the blooming daffodils, one cannot help but think that we will again have an early Spring, and much of it due, I believe, to increasing global warming.  We need more rain.  We need more precipitation.  Indeed, my son and I have even prayed for just a little bit of snow.  Already, two years have passed since the week that schools were closed and many businesses were shut down due to the snow and ice storm that was experienced here.  Not having snow here on a regular basis during winter is actually a let down for my son, and while I also miss it – being from the Northeast – I don’t miss the frigid sub-zero temperatures that sometimes accompany it.

Daffodils in January, Atlanta, Georgia Area, January 28, 2013

Daffodils in January, Atlanta, Georgia Area, January 28, 2013

Here in my home, we will keep praying for more winter, for more rain and precipitation, and perhaps, even for a little snow.  We need the rain to replenish our water tables and ground water levels.  We need the rain now so that the hot, dry, drought-like conditions of summer do not dry up our precious water.  Let’s hope and pray for more winter, more rain, and that the daffodils will return to dormancy until a true Spring arrives.