Time Goes by so Fast

IMG_3830.JPG

My son, a Life-rank Boy Scout, Snellville, Georgia, June 2018

It has been several months since I last posted here on WordPress. It’s not for a lack of desire to write or post, but because the time goes by so fast and I’m very busy with life. It’s actually a good feeling to be busy because I know I’m using my time wisely and constructively. Being there as a support for my teenage son in all of his activities, and continuing my work as a counselor takes up most of my time. It’s all very rewarding and it’s great to enjoy this time in my life. Because the time goes by so quickly, I know it’s important to enjoy every moment as much as possible.

My son has accomplished some milestones in the past several months since I last posted. When he turned 15, he got his driver’s permit here in Georgia. Right now, he is actually very busy, so he has practiced driving very little. Of course, there is more of that to come. In Boy Scouts, he attended two leadership camps this past summer, including one at Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico. It was a great experience for him. He also earned his Hornaday Badge Award and held his Honor Court for that in September. Now, he’s working on his Eagle project, and finishing up his last remaining Eagle-required merit badges. He really loves Boy Scouts and hopes to stick with it. School is also going well for him, and he is already a sophomore. I’m so proud of him! Indeed, the time goes by so fast!

Anna Maria Krakowiak Babcock (July 25, 1943 – March 7, 2018)

Mom and Dad 2002

Anna Maria Krakowiak Babcock (July 25, 1943 – March 7, 2018)

Anna Maria (Krakowiak) Babcock died on March 7, 2018 at her home in Snellville, Georgia after a long illness. Anna was a survivor of ovarian cancer. Shortly after her recovery, she was diagnosed with primary peritoneal cancer, which took her life.

Anna was born to Wladislawa “Lottie” (Bulera) Krakowiak and Janek “John” Krakowiak on July 25, 1944 in Schelerten, Germany. Anna’s parents, both Polish, endured two world wars in Europe, and decided to immigrate to the United States. Anna and her family came into the United States through Ellis Island, and moved to Gowanda, New York, near Buffalo in 1950, where Anna spent most of her life.

Anna graduated from Gowanda Central High School in 1963, and married Bruce Babcock, originally of Collins, New York, on July 6, 1963. Anna attended Jamestown Community College, studying business and psychology. She was employed at the Gowanda Psychiatric Center, and co-owned and operated the Sears Retail Store in Gowanda for many years, where she retired in 1982. In 2006, Anna moved to Snellville, Georgia, to be near her only grandchild, J. Bobby Nice, III.

Anna is survived by her husband, Bruce E. Babcock; her daughter, Michele E. Babcock-Nice; and her grandson, J. Bobby Nice, III, all of Snellville. Anna’s surviving son is Charles J. Babcock, of Gowanda. Anna is also survived by her sister, Maria (Krakowiak Spires) Walker, of Delray Beach, Florida, and Larry Krakowiak, of Gowanda. Anna’s surviving nephew is Phillip Spires, of Gowanda; and her surviving niece is Desiree (Spires) O’Malley of South Carolina. Anna was predeceased by her parents, and her brother, Peter Krakowiak, of Chicago, Illinois.

Among Anna’s favorite pastimes were gardening, cooking, baking, and spending time with family and friends. Anna was very religious and spiritual, and regularly prayed the Rosary. Anna, also known as “Mimi” to her family, was loved dearly by her husband and family, and will be sorely missed.

A memorial service for Anna will be held at St. John Neumann Catholic Church Marian Chapel in Lilburn on March 16, 2018 at 11:00 am. Funeral arrangements are by Wentland Funeral Home in North Collins, New York, and burial will be at Holy Cross Cemetery, associated with St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church, in Gowanda, New York. Memorial donations may be made to St. John Neumann Church or the American Cancer Society.

Trees Lost in Snellville due to Tropical Storm Irma

IMG_2487.JPG

A tree in my neighborhood lost to Tropical Storm Irma, Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

After the Carribean, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Florida were hard-hit by Hurricane Irma, its effects were felt here in Snellville, Georgia after it traveled up the west coast of Florida early last week.

We lost power for almost 1.5 days in Tropical Storm Irma that came through this area.  Traditional schools were closed for three days, and online schools closed for one day.  If what we experienced was a tropical storm, I’ve definitely never seen a rain and wind storm whip around the trees as it did.  Its amazing that more trees did not fall than actually did.

IMG_2485.JPG

Another tree down in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

In my neighborhood, alone, I counted six trees that fell after driving through my area, including a huge oak. With the heavy winds and the ground being saturated, trees with surface roots or those that were rotten fell easily.

IMG_2496.JPG

A fallen tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Just yesterday, in a nearby area, I observed power lines that were laying on the ground. Now, six days after the storm passed through, there are still people in my area who do not have electrical power.

IMG_2491.JPG

A couple of limbs that were ripped off of a tree in my neighborhood. Snellville, Georgia, September 12, 2017

Seeing the news on TV and the Internet of the damage that Irma did, my heart and prayers go out to everyone who weathered it.  May those who lost their lives rest in peace.  May those who are cleaning up and rebuilding get the help and support they need, quickly.

Mother Nature has shown that a category five hurricane is definitely something to take extremely seriously.

Snow in Snellville! (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

102_2344 (3)

Snow-covered tree in Snellville, Georgia, January 23, 2016

It has been about two years since there has been snow in Snellville, Georgia.  I, for one, have missed it!  It was a pleasure to awaken this morning to a slight covering of snow on the ground.  I took some photos around my yard this morning at 11:00 AM, reflecting some of the snow.  By 1:00 PM, it had all melted away!

With the blizzard conditions being experienced to the north of us, I was hoping that we would get more snow here today.  It’s always fun to make a snow man with my son or pull him around in the sled through the yard.

This weekend, we were planning to take a ski trip to North Carolina with my son’s scout troop.  What a disappointment it was not to go as a result of the weather conditions!

102_2346 (2)

Daffodils on snow-covered ground in Snellville, Georgia, January 23, 2016

When one grows up in ski country, one must take advantage of all the fun that the snowy winter conditions have to offer.  For all of those folks who have a distaste for snow and winter weather, I dislike the cold, but I love the snow.  In order to avoid cabin fever, it is important in areas that experience snow to have outdoor activities that one enjoys.

What I really miss about not living in a snowy winter region is the skiing, as well as snowmobiling.  Making snow people and snow angels, having snowball fights, munching on icicles – or just walking in the snow and enjoying its beauty – are activities that I miss.

Of course, I do not miss the high heating bills in winter, nor driving in treacherous conditions involving snow, ice, and slush.  I do not miss the road salt that eats up my vehicle, and requires me to wash it, frequently, at the car wash.  I do not miss water dripping through the ceiling due to all of the snow on the roof of the house.

102_2339 (2)

Icy bird baths on snow-covered ground in Snellville, Georgia, January 23, 2016

And, I do not miss frostbite (which I have experienced once in the past) due to the polar conditions.  I can further leave behind the extreme wind chills that make the outdoor temperatures so much colder than they really are.

There are definitely positive and negative things that one can experience as a result of snowy, winter weather.  I’m glad to have had these experiences, particularly so that I can know how to best care for myself and my family in conditions such as these.

Be prepared, think carefully, and be safe out there!

Fun at the Snellville First Baptist Church Trunk and Treat 2015 (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

My son as a Pokemon Trainer for Halloween at the Snellville First Baptist Church in Georgia, October 30, 2015

My son as a Pokemon Trainer for Halloween at the Snellville First Baptist Church in Georgia, October 30, 2015

What a beautiful evening it was on October 30 for the Trunk and Treat event at the Snellville, Georgia First Baptist Church to celebrate Halloween!

My son as a Pokemon Trainer for Halloween, with Minions, at the Snellville First Baptist Church in Georgia, October 30, 2015

My son as a Pokemon Trainer for Halloween, with Minions, at the Snellville First Baptist Church in Georgia, October 30, 2015

The multitude of people giving out candy and kids receiving it made for an enjoyable event for the many who came to the event.

My son being "eaten" by the red M&M at Snellville's First Baptist Church Trunk and Treat, October 30, 2015

My son being “eaten” by the red M&M at Snellville’s First Baptist Church Trunk and Treat, October 30, 2015

I dare say this was probably the most fun my son has ever had trick or treating for Halloween.  Thank you to everyone for making this such an outstanding event! 🙂

Dogwoods and Azaleas in Full Bloom (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

A couple of days ago, following a heavy, soaking rain in central Georgia near Atlanta, many trees and flowers are now in full bloom, particularly dogwood trees and azalea bushes.  They are really beautiful, and I wanted to share some photos of them here.  Happy Spring!

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Purple Flowers, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Purple Flowers, Snellville, Georgia, April 10, 2014

Pink Azaleas, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Azaleas, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

White Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

Pink Dogwood, Snellville, Georgia, April 17, 2014

These are some of my photos of a few of the flowering bushes and trees in my area.  I hope you have enjoyed viewing them!

“Fantastic Swimming Experience at Local Park Pool” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

My Son Enjoying a Summer Swimming Lesson, Briscoe Park, Snellville, Georgia, July 2013

My Son Enjoying a Summer Swimming Lesson, Briscoe Park, Snellville, Georgia, July 2013

For the past five years, my son has taken Summer swimming lessons at Snellville’s Briscoe Park.  For four of those five years, the area business, Positively Pools, has been contracted to provide life guards, swimming instructors, supervisors, and maintenance for the pool.  It is my absolute pleasure to share the overall wonderful experiences my son has had in taking swimming lessons, as well as in swimming recreationally at the pool.

I would like to take this time, therefore, to thank the managers and staff of Briscoe Park, as well as the employees of Positively Pools for consistently providing my family with such outstanding experiences with swimming at Briscoe Park.  Folks such as Justin, Stephen, Amber, Gabby, Deluir, Gabby, and so many others have repeatedly evidenced their exceptional professionalism, customer service, courtesy, and expertise to us. 

Thank you, everyone, for all of your hard work, commitment, and dedication to consistently doing the best of your ability in being flexible, open-minded, professional, courteous, and dedicated.  It is folks like you who help make swimming an enjoyable and safe experience for everyone – and that’s how it should be.  Keep up the great work!

“Neighborhoods that have Gone to the Dogs” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

When was the last time that you were able to take a stroll on your street or in your neighborhood, and not be bothered in some way by a loose dog?  Really, I cannot even walk down my own street and enjoy a leisurely walk with my son and dog without being approached and/or attempt to be attacked by some territorial and/or aggressive dog! 

These situations that I have encountered (with or without my son and dog) of being unable to experience a calm and peaceful walk on my street or in my neighborhood have reached beyond the level of patience, and have entered into the realm of frustration and discouragement.   A neighbor is not a good neighbor if he or she allows his or her dog to run loose.  Whenever I am out walking – whether with or without my son and dog – somebody’s loose dog always finds me.  And, while there is absolutely no reason for the dog to feel threatened, it is going to act like a dog, becoming territorial and/or aggressive, as I have experienced on the majority of occasions.

Pit Bulls may Appear to be Calm, but can be Unpredictable, Retrieved from http://greyhoundinjuryfund.wordpress.com/tag/foster-pit-bulls/

Pit Bulls may Appear to be Calm, but can be Unpredictable, Retrieved from http://greyhoundinjuryfund.wordpress.com/
tag/foster-pit-bulls/

In the past month, I have taken five walks on my street with my dog, with four of the five of those walks also with my son.  On four of the five occasions, we have been approached by a territorial and/or aggressive dog.  I have reached the point with people’s dogs where it has crossed the line; enough is enough.  Literally every time I go out on my street to take a walk, I encounter some confrontation with someone’s loose dog.

The new people who moved in on my street two months ago have completely ignored the leash law that is on the books in my city.  They have a brown male pit bull dog and a black Labrador retriever.  Both dogs ran up to us in a territorial and/or aggressive manner in the street and away from their own property while we were on our walks.  Neither of the dogs backed off, but instead came closer, with one barking and growling at us.  Both dogs got a face of mace, with one getting it twice before it backed off. 

On the encounter with the black Lab owned by the new neighbors, the owner came out of her house when she heard her dog barking, calling the dog inside, at which point I pleasantly informed her about the leash law and to please keep her dog leashed.  I also called the police in regard to both instances, and on both occasions, action was taken by the authorities which is very much appreciated!  Police who take these issues seriously provide a wonderful and needed community service to protect citizens such as myself and my family.  I have since found that these neighbors paid the citation that they were issued; being ticketed and fined appears to cause dog owners to take these situations more seriously. 

Black Labrador Retriever, Retrieved from http://lesliedenning.com/musings-from-the-lake/

Black Labrador Retriever, Retrieved from http://lesliedenning.com/musings-from-the-lake/

Another neighbor on my street has a white poodle and a brown female pit bull dog.  A similar type of situation occurred regarding the bit bull in which I was walking my dog, and the pit bull ran up to us in the street, this time at the location of it’s property/territory.  The pit bull felt so territorially-threatened simply by us walking down the street that it ran up to us with it’s fur raised on it’s back.  The owner was in his back shed, and I yelled out to him, asking if he could call his dog, and he did as I shared with him what had occurred.  He said that the dog is timid, however that he would put her in her pen.  Typically, this dog owner is reliable, however there is always that one time that is unpredictable.

Just today, my son and I were walking down our street with our dog again, and guess what?  You got it, there was a loose white poodle that approached us and tried to attack both my son and I.  This dog belongs to yet another neighbor in the cul de sac nearest to us.  Those dog owners also have at least two Labrador retrievers, as well, though they are always maintained in the fenced backyard. 

White Poodle, Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:White_Standard_Poodle.jpg

White Poodle, Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/
wiki/File:White_Standard_Poodle.jpg

Regarding this particular poodle, it was barking aggressively and ran over to us from fully two yards away from it’s own property, trying to bite me. To defend myself, I was flailing my leg, trying to kick it, but instead, my sandal flew off.  My son ran in the other direction away from the dog, and the dog went off chasing him.  I called to my son to stop, otherwise the dog would bite him, and I threw my sandal at it.  When the owner came looking for her dog, I explained what happened, and she was very uncaring and insensitive about it.  I therefore stated that she keep her dog on a leash, or I would call the police.

In my current neighborhood, in the past five years, there have also been three other occasions during which I have been approached by other brown male pit bull dogs in a territorial and/or aggressive manner.  It has been because of those occasions that I began carrying dog mace.  I do not desire to be a prisoner of my own street or neighborhood because of being unable to take a leisurely stroll, but without mace or some other protection from people’s loose, aggressive and/or territorial dogs, that is what is necessary to protect oneself at the minimum.

In my previous neighborhood in which I lived, during a three year period, I was approached in an aggressive and/or territorial manner by several of the pit bull dogs owned by one particular family.  In those three years, I called the police in regard to those encounters on four occasions.  While the county animal control agency responded on each occasion, it took four times of calling the police in order for these people to get fined, and to finally begin making sure that their dogs remained penned or leashed. 

These occasions were particularly sensitive because they occurred during a time when my son was a baby and/or toddler, and we did not have a fenced backyard.  Therefore, these pit bulls from three doors up the street from us were often loose, even approaching us while we were in our back yard.  Imagine peacefully playing with your toddler in your backyard, and then staring at a pit bull coming toward you.  I remember that on that occasion, all I had for protection was a broom, which I held at the dog while telling it to go away. 

Here in the Atlanta area, it appears that the dog of choice for many people is the pit bull.  While many people like pit bulls and tell of how wonderful they are, I disagree.  On each and every encounter that I have had with a pit bull – particularly the male pit bulls – they are territorial and/or aggressive, sometimes ferociously aggressive.  And, there is no reason for it.  A person cannot even take a peaceful, leisurely walk in their own neighborhood without having to constantly watch out for and protect oneself from someone’s loose, nasty dog.  All it would take is for people to be sure that their dog is leashed and/or properly maintained in a fenced backyard or pen so that it is unable to get loose. 

So, here around Atlanta, there are many neighborhoods that have gone to the dogs.  Too many people are inconsiderate of their neighbors, and are unable to simply keep their dogs leashed or in their fenced backyard.  In fact, of each of the dogs who have approached me and/or my son, dog, and I on our walks, all of their dog owners have fenced backyards.  Rather than maintain the dogs in the fenced backyards, however, they allow them to run loose.  This certainly creates an unfair situation for all of us dog owners who always leash and control our dogs, and it creates an unnecessary stressful and hostile situation between people who are outside walking and the dogs that have been allowed to run loose. 

It would be nice to be able to take a walk on my street and in my neighborhood, and enjoy it rather than have to face and confront another loose, territorial, and/or aggressive dog that someone has allowed to run loose.  It would be nice, but I don’t think it’s going to happen.  There is a leash law in my city, but most people in my neighborhood disregard it.  These people are not good neighbors, and more than that, they are contributing to a situation that may be potentially harmful and injurious for others.  

Therefore, would like to appeal to everyone to keep your dogs leashed or in your fenced backyard, for the enjoyment and safety of everyone.  Dogs can do much harm and injury to people (as reflected in two of the photo sections shown herein) – and even cause death.  All of this is unnecessary if dog owners would remain mindful about their pets, keeping them properly controlled at all times.

“A Golden Fifty Years of Marriage” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Happy 50th Wedding Anniversary, Dad and Mom, July 2013 (Photo by Emmett Clower, July 2002, Snellville, Georgia)

Happy 50th Wedding Anniversary, Dad and Mom, July 2013 (Photo by Emmett Clower, July 2002, Snellville, Georgia)

What does it mean to be married for 50 years?  My parents can tell you!  This month, July 2013, my parents are celebrating their golden wedding anniversary!  All I can say is, “Wow!” 

My parents are a living and true example of what it means to be married to each other for fifty years.  My parents were married in July 1963, very shortly after they both graduated from high school in Western New York State.  They have lived and grown together in married life during these past 50 years.  They have experienced many ups and downs in their lives, and have weathered and survived them. 

My parents are a true example of people who are meant to be together.  They seem to balance each other in personality; what one may lack, the other makes up for, and vice versa.  It has always been interesting to me that they both share the same astrological sign, though they seem to get along with and understand each other very well. 

My Parents on Their Wedding Day, July 1963, Gowanda, New York

My Parents on Their Wedding Day, July 1963, Gowanda, New York

I can say that, throughout the years, I have witnessed much love and forgiveness of my parents toward each other.  This, I believe, is the glue that has held their marriage together.  They have forgiven each other for the wrongs that they have done to each other – whether realized or not – and this outlook has helped them to reach such a monumental achievement.

In this age when most marriages likely don’t make it to a silver anniversary of 25 years, my parents have doubled that!  My marriage lasted 7.5 years, and the relationship, itself, endured for 9 years.  I have said to my former spouse that my parents experienced alot worse things in their lives than he and I ever did in our marriage, and my parents have remained loving, committed, and bonded to each other.  I asked my ex why we couldn’t achieve that, however it was just not possible.  People have to be willing to be open, loving, understanding, and forgiving of each other; some people simply are unable to be that way, and so, their marriages do not last. 

My parents celebrating their 50th Wedding Anniversary, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

My Parents Celebrating Their 50th Wedding Anniversary, July 2013, Snellville, Georgia

In good, strong marriages, those who benefit the most from the stable and loving union are the children and grandchildren.  My parents have been wonderful role models for my brother and I, and also for my son – my parents’ only grandchild.  My parents’ strong, loving union has served as a beacon of hope for our family, in good times and in bad.  It is a great comfort to know that whatever happens in our lives, our parents (and grandparents in the experience of my son) are always there for us. 

Thanks, Dad and Mom, for remaining loving, committed, and loyal to each other through these many years.  You have achieved an amazing accomplishment, one that I never will and can only imagine and experience as an observer.  Congratulations and best wishes on celebrating your Golden Wedding Anniversary; and may God bless you!

“Experiencing Workplace Discrimination and Retaliation” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Shiloh Middle School Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Shiloh Middle School Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

From 2007-2008, I taught at Shiloh Middle School in Snellville, Georgia, located in Gwinnett County.  Shiloh is a public school, and is a school that is part of the largest public school system in Georgia – which school system is also Georgia’s largest employer.  Due to unbearable discrimination and retaliation that I experienced as a teacher at Shiloh, from school administrators, and as a result of upper administrators doing nothing to stop it, I taught there for only one year, having already had several years of prior outstanding experience, positive recommendations, and excellent formal evaluations of my teaching at other schools.

During the painful experience that I had at Shiloh, I resigned mid-way through the academic year with such resignation taking effect at the close of the academic year, hoping that the discrimination, racism, harassment, bullying, and retaliation that I was experiencing would stop, but it only increased and escalated.  😦  For the past five years, my experience has been so painful that I have not shared about it, publicly.  However, I believe that it is important for my experience to be shared; perhaps sharing about my experience with help others who are coping with similar discrimination.

Discrimination – in particular, workplace or employment discrimination – is something that people typically do not want to talk about, recognize, or address.  In my experience, it was also something that virtually no one who had the authority and ability to stop it did so.  😦  The discrimination that I experienced included many different actions by school administrators, such as deliberately falsifying my students’ county benchmark test scores and thereby reducing my teacher performance rating, stating that I had more below grade performers than was accurate on the school system’s internal rating instrument, termed the Results-Based Evaluation System (RBES).  It also included creating a hostile work environment in many ways, including being administratively unsupportive of me – and instead, supportive of the student – when the student threatened me with physical harm in class.   

Other ways in which I experienced an unsupportive and hostile environment were when administrators placed me on a type of “improvement” plan, evaluated me approximately 25 times during a three month period, and had virtually nothing positive to say about my teaching in any of their evaluations.  Note that I came from all prior teaching employment positions with positive recommendations and satisfactory evaluations; my reputation was outstanding.  Yet, when I successfully completed all of the facets of the “improvement” plan at Shiloh, further “evidence” was fabricated by the principal to support that my teaching was “unsatisfactory,” thus causing him to fulfill his goal in “proving” that my teaching was not satisfactory.  Additionally, when administrators observed several lessons per week in my classes, many students found it amusing and entertaining.  Thus, my credibility and reputation were diminished, and it made it more difficult and challenging to teach effectively. 

Chemicals in Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Chemicals in Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Further discrimination I experienced were denials from administrators for me to participate in off-site professional development opportunities, as well as the school system purposely failing to supply the Professional Standards Commission with any of my professional development hours and credits earned during that year to go toward my recertification.  Other discrimination I experienced included not being provided with the necessary educational materials for required curricular lessons (though I repeatedly requested them and they were not ordered by administrators), and using such lack against me in evaluations and performance reviews.

Other types of discrimination that I experienced included when the principal gave false information about me to a human resources employee, also causing such employee to be completely unsupportive of me as a competent and valued employee of the school system.   I was also subjected to dozens of “disciplinary” and performance-related meetings; and was required to observe the instruction of several colleagues as part of my “training,” including that of an inexperienced, first-year teacher.  Because I stood up for and defended myself to my immediate superiors, many upper administrators within the school system – up to and including the superintendent – as well as by providing documentation about my experiences to leaders at the Georgia Department of Education and Professional Standards Commission, I experienced even more discrimination and retaliation from the school principal.  While an official from the state education commissioner’s office contacted me and was supportive of me, he stated that the department did not have oversight pertaining to the issues that I was experiencing.  And, the state standards commission for educators did not recognize any policy or ethics violations of my administrative supervisors, expunging the cases.

Eventually, the school principal had so much documentation against me that he was able to falsely substantiate changing my teaching position from that of a science teacher to being a careers teacher.  Removing me from my team of core teaching colleagues, he informed parents by letter sent home from school through their children of his “personnel change.”  Eventually, my replacement in my subject area of science was made through cronyism, the fact that the school administrators placed one of their close faculty friends in my position.  Interestingly, for some time during and after the “personnel change,” this replacement faculty colleague of mine was not identified on the school’s website as even being employed at the school; her name was removed from the website.

Upon the change in subject area that the principal forced upon me for the last quarter of the academic year, he directed that my work space be the school’s science storage room that housed flammable chemicals.  So, not only did my workspace change from a formal classroom to a storage room – it was a storage room in which there were many flammable chemicals and materials, most of which were not properly stored.  In this storage room, I was provided with a desk and chair only.  I was not provided with a computer or any access to an intercom or other communication device, as were present in each teacher’s classroom.  Throughout this article are found several photographs that reflect this workspace that the school principal directed me to use. 

Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Upon my being required to use the science storage room with the flammable chemicals as my workspace by the school principal, I wrote to and informed the regional director of OSHA about the situation, and received a response from him that because my workplace was a public rather than private employer, nothing could be done to stop or change it.  I wrote to the state’s governor.  I wrote to the school system’s superintendent and internal resolution director.  Prior to that, I wrote to and met with the human resources division director.  I contacted the superintendent on three occasions, and never received a reply.  When nothing was changed or improved, I contacted each member of the school system’s board of education.  It was only through those communications did the superintendent act to have the human resources chief officer meet with me, at which time I explained to her what was occurring, including being required to work out of a science storage room, filled with flammable chemicals.  As a result of meeting with her, the discrimination and additional racism that I experienced continued, though my work space was changed to an outdoor trailer.

One particular racist situation that I encountered was when a school administrator who was African-American, directed me not to eat my lunch during a staff development meeting, however she did not inform or direct my African-American colleagues not to eat their lunch during the same staff meeting.  When I approached the school principal and informed him about the unfairness of this situation, he became angry with and yelled at me, stating that he was “disgusted” that I brought race into the situation.  I brought race into the situation?  Race was made a factor in the situation by the school administrator; I only approached and informed him of it so that he would be aware of it and so that such types of situations would cease.  This situation, however, worked in my favor because this particular administrator happened to be my second main evaluator, and because of the situation and the racism that I expressed that I experienced, my evaluator was changed to a different administrator who was somewhat more supportive. 

There were also several other racist experiences that I encountered, including being overlooked for off-site professional development opportunities that were instead issued to African-Americans, being nearly prevented from participating in certain school-related activities such as judging in the science fair, and being repimanded for my class being talkative though certain classes of my African-American colleagues were out-of-control, without that being addressed at all.  Several of my colleagues also experienced racist encounters with school adminstrators, the same and/or similar to those that I did. 

All of those 15 of my colleagues who experienced those similar encounters left the school, as I did.  When the “leaders” of large corporations such as that which this school is a part treat their subordinates in the manner in which we were, many employees discover the harsh reality that they and their well-being do not matter, and that money and image are indeed more important than they are – the hard-working and dedicated talent who comprise the very foundation of the company.  It was proven that people don’t matter to these corporate “leaders” – only money and image matter.

Throughout my employment at Shiloh and as a result of the constant and unending discrimination that I experienced from school administrators, I experienced a variety of health problems, and sought and obtained regular medical treatment for them.  In all of my employment positions, I have been a dedicated worker, and have been absent during very few days during each year.  During my year at Shiloh, I missed 20 days due to the stress and medical problems that I experienced as a result of the discrimination I endured there.  Both my physician and legal representative repeatedly encouraged me to leave Shiloh as soon as possible, however I was unable to do so because 1) I love teaching; 2) I needed an income; 3) I was unable to obtain a teaching position with a different school system; 4) I was not released from my contract; 5) the state stipulates that a teacher must not abandon their contract; if that occurs, then licensure could potentially be revoked; and 6) human resources did not honor my request for a transfer.  Additionally, this particular time in my life was the worst due to experiencing severely stressful issues outside of employment, including divorce, grief, and a family situation that involved trauma.

During my year at Shiloh Middle School and throughout the discriminatory experiences that I had, I survived my experience through the assistance of my legal representative with the Georgia Educators Association, a professional teachers’ group.  My legal representative, a man of about 30 years of experience in providing professional support and legal suggestions about how to proceed and how to best protect myself, is a graduate of a prestigious Ivy League university.  In addition to his advice, my legal representative also informed me that the school system, in fact, trains their administrators on how they can discriminate and retaliate against employees.  I will always be thankful and grateful for this man’s assistance as he helped me through this extremely painful employment experience.

Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Shiloh Science Storage Room Teacher Workspace, March 2008

Following my departure from Shiloh, I contacted a few attorneys about the situation that I experienced, and none wanted to take my case.  My educators’ association legal representative had also informed me that unless there were others who were willing to come forward about their experiences (there were 15, however no others pursued the matter, and instead transferred, retired, or left the school), a legal case would likely not be successful.  He also informed me that individuals who had similar legal cases against the school system, at that time, were already in their fourth to sixth years in adjudication, with no end in sight and no guarantee of success. 

In order to make myself “heard” and to receive possible support from government agencies, therefore, I applied for unemployment compensation through the Georgia Department of Labor, and was denied.  I appealed the decision, and was again denied.  The reason that I was given was that, basically, the employment situation that I experienced was not of a quality that I should have resigned.  It wasn’t?  Following those denials of support, I called up my bravery and courage, and submitted a charge of discrimination with the EEOC in Atlanta.  Again, I was unsupported; and the case was closed, with the EEOC investigator informing me in March 2010 (more than 1.5 years after placing my charge) that the agency was unable to conclude that a violation of statutes was established, though it did not mean that the employer was in compliance with the statutes.  So, it would appear that all of what I experienced was entirely legal – or, my case was not strong enough.

Since working at and leaving my employment at Shiloh, I have been unable to secure employment in teaching – the career that is my passion.  I have volunteered as a teacher and/or adult leader on numerous occasions and throughout many years with particular schools, churches, and organizations, so my life continues to be enriched and fulfilled by being able to teach.  However, the eduation for which I built my teaching career has not continued in the manner that I had anticipated.  Though there are other interests that I have pursued, and that I am able to be more fully available as a mom to my son, I miss the opportunity to teach and more fully utilize my education and background to support others and assist them in reaching and exceeding their potentials.

I believe that the discrimination that I experienced by the school administrators at Shiloh was a result of being outspoken and perhaps being intellectually threatening to my superior(s).  Because I am a person who likes to learn and understand, I have a natural capacity to question.  Sadly, people may misjudge an individual’s questions as being threatening when they are only trying to learn and/or support themselves in understanding others.  I always put in extra time on the job, always went the extra mile, always bent over backwards in my work.  When I saw something that could be improved or done better, I identified it and supported it to administrators.  When I observed student gang activity at the school, I became outspoken about ways to stop it.  The principal was angry and hostile with me about it, and therefore, did anything possible to be professionally and personally unsupportive of me. 

Additionally, during the prior academic year, the school did not achieve a passing rating on Annual Yearly Progress (AYP), so it had been officially identified as a failing school.  And, the much-loved and experienced veteran principal had retired at the close of the previous academic year.  Because of these two issues, as well as the student gang activity, faculty morale at the school was extremely low; I took the initiative and met with the principal on three occasions early on in the academic year, sharing my suggestions with him on how to raise and improve faculty morale.  As a result, I believe that the principal and his administrative colleagues did whatever they could to attempt to silence me and/or force me out so that their own actions or inactions regarding particular issues would not be called into question.    Simply because I desired to learn, understand, and contribute to creating a better and safer school for everyone, I experienced discrimination by the school administrators that was the most severe of anyone at the school.

Shiloh Middle School, Snellville, Georgia, 2013

Shiloh Middle School, Snellville, Georgia, 2013

Some people have advised me not to publicy-share about my experience, while others have.  Those who have advised me to remain silent believe they are protecting my best interests so that no further retaliation toward me will occur in other avenues.  I have been particularly inspired by two people to share my experiences, publicly.  Those who have encouraged me to share about my experiences have stated that by being silent, I am protecting the offenders.  As I have gotten older and have reflected upon many experiences in my life, I do believe it is important to inform others of our experiences – as a way of it being individually therapeutic, but also so that others will know and understand my experiences, and perhaps be able to change and improve such situations for others. 

By sharing my honest and true experiences, publicly, I would like to request positive change, and for people to support – rather than harm – each other in the workplace, and in our society.  My article provides an opportunity for agencies, organizations, and employers to recognize and support individuals, such as myself, who have had experiences similar to mine.  It is much easier and more cost-effective for employers to support employees rather than focus unnecessary and inappropriate energies on harming them.  Recognize and support good employees for who they are; no longer harm them through harmful and negative control, bullying, intimidation, and domination.  Please pray for, reflect upon, and support this occurrence.

As a further result of my workplace experience while teaching at Shiloh, I created the LinkedIn group, “Educators Against Retaliation,” in September 2011, later renaming it “People Against Retaliation and Bullying.”  This is an open group in which any member of LinkedIn can view and/or join.  The main purposes of the group are to identify and address bullying, retaliation, intimidation, and bullicide (suicide due to bullying), as well as the prevention of all of these.  Participating members have helped and supported each other by sharing their experiences and/or the experiences of others, related to workplace bullying, school bullying, bullicide, and retaliation.  One group member actually shared her personal success story in winning her legal case against her employer for wrongful termination.

With bullying and retaliation having come to the forefront of social issues within our society, people must realize the seriousness and severity of such actions.  😦  When adults are bullied at work by other adults, when children are bullied by peers and/or adults at school, and even when citizens in the community experience bullying throughout our society, it is clear and obvious that the issues must be identified and addressed, and for improvement and positive change to occur.  When large corporations can get away with the type of illegal actions at work that I experienced, one realizes that such actions are engrained in our workplaces, culture, and society.  Countries throughout Europe have strict laws against the types of discrimination and retaliation that I experienced.  It is long past time for such laws to be enacted and enforced in the United States, in order to protect the rights of individuals who have experienced such wrongs, rather than shielding employers from being accountable and responsible for the actions of toxic employees who are free to utilize such harmful practices.