Too many Truckers don’t Follow Rules of the Road (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Semi-Truck in Passing Lane on 985 in Suwanee, Georgia, June 25, 2015

Semi-Truck in Passing Lane on 985 in Suwanee, Georgia, June 25, 2015

When I was growing up and all throughout the nearly 30 years that I lived in New York State, I never recall observing any truckers driving in the passing lane – particularly on highways and thruways – at least for any longer than it took to pass slower vehicles and return to the “slow” or “truck” lane.  Ever since I began living in the Southern United States 15 years ago, I keep seeing more and more truckers (especially semi-truck and big-rig truck drivers) actually driving in the passing lane.  And, those whom I see are typically driving very fast and are not just passing to pass – they are trucking along in the passing lane.

On the highways around Atlanta, Georgia, the typical speed limit is between 65-70 miles per hour, which is really already more than fast enough. Driving at high rates of speed creates less control of a vehicle, but when truckers are driving even faster than the speed limit – and in the passing lane – it’s a recipe for disaster.  There are too many truckers taking too many risks on the road, with driving too fast, driving in the passing lane, and thinking they are able to control their rigs (when they can’t) at those rates of speed.

For these reasons, and because there is so, so much truck traffic on the highways all throughout the South, I am very hesitant to drive on them, particularly with any family members riding with me.  I do my best to be a defensive driver.  If I see someone being reckless, I hang back.  Those who are driving fast, I just let them go right on by.

Last summer, I was driving north on 85 out of Atlanta, and a driver in a car passed me at – I would estimate – 100 miles per hour or faster.  I prayed that the driver would not kill themselves or others as I expected for an accident to occur.  Surely enough, I eventually got up the road a bit further on 985 about 10 minutes after the driver passed me, and found that he/she had crossed the grass median, crossed the double-lane highway on the other side, and was in the woods.

This driver has nothing to do with truckers, however the example is one that reflects the high rates of speed at which most people drive in the South.  I am proud that nearly all drivers pass me on the highway.  I am content to travel at the speed limit, and will happily move over and give much room to those who fly by so fast that I can’t even read their license plate number.

Coca Cola Semi-Truck in Passing Lane on Buford Drive near Mall of Georgia, June 25, 2015

Coca Cola Semi-Truck in Passing Lane on Buford Drive near Mall of Georgia, June 25, 2015

Back to the truckers, however, it really got to me today when I was doing business in and near Buford, Georgia that I photographed two semi-trucks in the passing lanes of the highways.  Now, certainly, it is not illegal for truckers to drive in the passing lane, however it makes the roads less safe for everyone traveling on them.  One trucker was driving in the passing lane for at least two miles on 985 near Suwanee, and a driver of a Coca-Cola semi-truck was driving in the passing lane on Buford Drive just south of the Mall of Georgia for five or more miles.

It is tiresome to regularly observe truckers driving in the passing lane, creating potentially unsafe situations for other drivers, and just plain not following the rules of the road.  Too many truckers have no regard for drivers in vehicles with babies, young children, or the elderly.  And, typically, I observe young male drivers take too many risks in their vehicles by cutting off and swerving in and out of lanes to get around truckers.  This just puts everyone on the road at risk of injury or death.

The need for speed in the South is obviously much greater than a respect and appreciation for life and safety.  Every time people drive on the road, they are at risk, but the risks can be reduced if everyone drives more slowly and safely.  But, unfortunately, I know that’s not going to happen.

“Southerners Insist on Challenging Treacherous Weather Conditions” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Snow and Ice Melting on my Street, Snellville, Georgia, January 29, 2014

Snow and Ice Melting on my Street, Snellville, Georgia, January 29, 2014

Here we go again.  Here in the South, we are seeing yet another repeat of situations that have occurred in past winters in which there were treacherous icy and snowy conditions outside.  A couple of years ago, there was a snow storm that came through the South, leaving the Atlanta, Georgia area, where I live, shut down for one entire week.  Yesterday and today, we are, again, experiencing icy and snowy conditions that have caused numerous vehicle collisions and stranded 1,000s of motorists.

Obviously, folks have not learned from past experiences, is all I can think of.  When there is two inches of snow that covers wet roads that have turned icy, that is a good enough reason for me to stay put.  I don’t understand why other folks don’t do the same, unnecessarily risking life and limb to challenge Mother Nature, and often, losing in doing so.

My Son Having Fun Sledding, Snellville, Georgia, January 29, 2014

My Son Having Fun Sledding, Snellville, Georgia, January 29, 2014

Two years ago, I wrote a letter to the editor of the Atlanta Journal Constitution about this same type of situation.  While my letter was right on topic and publishable, it was declined because there were already other letters on this issue that had been published, as I was informed by a newspaper staff member.  That’s fine, but I would like to make my point, again, that plows with salters and sanders are necessary in Georgia, and in other places throughout the South, for that matter.

Snowy Trees in Georgia, January 29, 2014

Snowy Trees in Georgia, January 29, 2014

The argument against such plows about which I read in media in the past is solely due to cost.  However, I believe that it is better to be safe than sorry.  To me, it would be worthwhile for state departments of transportation to invest in some plows with salters and sanders, and to plow at least main roads and highways when weather conditions become as treacherous as they are now.

I have heard and read blame directed toward the state transportation authorities for not ensuring these measures.  I have also observed and read in the media in the past that counties and municipalities in Georgia, particularly in and around the Atlanta metro area, have taken it upon themselves to invest in plows and to do plowing in weather conditions in which it is needed.  In light of all considerations and observations of which I am aware, I believe this is a smart move.  In the long run, these measures will have prevented innumerable vehicle accidents from occurring as well as having maintained the safety of those folks who insist on being out on the roads in such treacherous icy and snowy conditions.

Snowy Bushes in Georgia, January 29, 2014

Snowy Bushes in Georgia, January 29, 2014

Really, the best place to be when experiencing snow and ice in the South is indoors.  Emergency responders and the National Guard are over-extended when situations such as this occur, and people do not simply stay indoors.  Because there is such a lack of investment in snow removal machines and equipment in the South, folks here are forced to wait it out until the snow melts and safer road conditions return, or they can continue to try to challenge these type of conditions, and lose.

In places where there is little to no snow removal equipment used, why insist on challenging treacherous weather conditions?  In dealing with such treacherous icy and snowy weather conditions, it is better to be safe than sorry.    I believe that is the best philosophy in situations such as these.   On the other hand, however, life in the South should not come to a halt due to snow and ice.  People and the economy are placed at risk, and both suffer unnecessarily because of the lack of resources to effectively deal with the effects of winter weather.  Positive and progressive change are necessary in this area.

References:

Crary, D. (January 29, 2014).  “Snow and ice send South’s flagship city reeling.”  MSN.com.  Retrieved on January 29, 2014 from http://news.msn.com/us/after-storm-helicopters-search-for-stranded-drivers

Henry, R., & Bynum, R. (January 29, 2014).  “1 day after storm, Atlanta highways still gridlocked.”  MSN.com.  Retrieved on January 29, 2014 from http://news.msn.com/us/snowstorm-slams-the-south-leaves-drivers-stranded

Sen, C. (January 29, 2014).  “How 2 inches of snow created a traffic nightmare in Atlanta.”  MSN.com.  Retrieved on January 29, 2014 from http://news.msn.com/us/how-2-inches-of-snow-created-a-traffic-nightmare-in-atlanta

“Women need more Appreciation and Respect” (By: Michele Babcock-Nice)

Is it just me, or does this happen to women alot?  Women who are assertive, confident, direct, honest, independent, educated, and who may be single, divorced, and/or widowed are unappreciated and not respected by many men.  Not only are such women unappreciated and not respected by men, but also by other women and the greater society, and others may feel very threatened by their confidence and assertiveness – and blame the women for it due to their own discomfort!  What is it about us?  What is it that people dislike?

I’m not a person who asks for or tends to “need” alot from others.  I try to “handle” and cope with the majority of situations and experiences that I have independently.  I’m not a gossip, though when something is going wrong and could be improved or enhanced, I speak up, making myself and my views known.  What I find is that, for the most part, most people just don’t care.  In fact, I often find that the more I speak up, the worse the situation gets.

Why is that?  Do most people believe that they have enough of their own life situations to deal with?  Do they feel that there is no need to invest anything, emotionally, into someone else’s difficulties, challenges, struggles, or troubles?  Are people afraid to get involved?  Or, is it that they really, simply just don’t care?

It would be interesting to me if a study was performed to research all of these attributes and characteristics of women, and the manner in which men, other women, and even the greater society views and/or treats us.  It would also be interesting to me to ascertain whether or not there are differences in such perspectives and treatment of women across different regions of the country – such as in the north, south, east, and west – in the United States. 

The South is known as the Stroke Belt.  Of course, there are studies that have been completed about why this is so.  I would like to offer my own simple analysis, not based on any research, but based on my own observations and experiences. 

It seems to me that women in the South are often not allowed to be themselves.  In order to be fully accepted into Southern society, women are subtly and silently “required” to speak and behave more like men, be supportive cheerleaders of men, be agreeable and not ask any questions of men, and be submissive to and/or dependent on men.  Additionally, women in the South are required to do all of these things while also remaining “beautiful,” appearing young, and being a great physical, mental, and emotional condition.  Any women who does not seem to “meet” those requirements is not part of the “in” and/or “accepted” crowd.

Perhaps unknowingly, women in other parts of the country do the same, to a certain extent.  Women unconsciously “conform” ourselves to fit in and be more socially acceptable.  How many women do you know believe they have to drink with their boyfriend and/or his buddies at sports games in order to fit in and be acceptable?  How many women do you know pile on the make-up, and spend loads of money for hair and nail treatments, thinking that this makes them more attractive?  How many women do you see at your workplace who are especially kind and friendly to the boss, seeking more favor?

It is not easy to be a woman in today’s society.  Women are “required” to do, say, and “be” so many things, to serve in so many roles.  And, in all this, women are also expected not to become upset, not to complain, not to vent, not to become emotional.  We are expected to be able to handle it all!  Certainly, some of us can be considered superwomen, but after awhile, the stresses, pressures, expectations, and requirements take their toll.  Stroke, cancer, heart disease, and other conditions and/or ailments are a result of the constant, unceasing expectations and requirements that society places upon us. 

Therefore, women need more appreciation and respect in our society – in our families, our homes, our churches, our communities, our nation, our world.  People ought to try to place themselves in another’s shoes and walk in those shoes for awhile.  Rather than overlooking, not appreciating, and not respecting each other’s experiences and who we are as individuals, people must realize that life isn’t always easy for everyone.  Their lack of appreciation, and absence of understanding and respect just makes it that much more difficult for us.  But again, do they really care? 

As a member of a particular group at my church, I was recently overlooked by the male leader of the group.  The leader is about my age, married, and has a family, though he always appeared to take a sort of “flippant” and uncaring attitude toward me.  Today, he realized that he had not included me on any of the group’s e-mails and communications for several months, and that by doing so, I was not informed of a group meeting and photo.  He apologized to me about the situation – by e-mail – though it all just brought tears to my eyes. 

Why am I the person who is regularly overlooked, unappreciated, uncared for, not respected?  Are all of my positive qualities that much of a threat to others that they consciously or unconsciously exclude me from their own thinking?  It is so disppointing and tragic to keep experiencing these types of situations over and over again.  I could change who I am, but then I wouldn’t be “me.”  Maybe most people would like me better if I was more gossipy, untruthful, and fake.  I wouldn’t be true to myself if I behaved like that.  I wonder how many people would truly be able to walk in my shoes?